Serves 6 / 25 Mins

How to make: Eggnog Cocktail

How to make: Eggnog Cocktail

Ingredients

  • Spirits and Mixers
  • 6 egg yolks
    470ml whole milk
    235ml of heavy whipping cream
    175ml Brandy
    60ml Dark rum
    32 g of sugar
    ½ teaspoon of vanilla extract
    ¼ tea spoon of salt
  • Garnish
  • ¼ teaspoon of ground nutmeg
    1 Cinnamon Stick

Method

  1. Beat Yolks until frothy.
  2. Warm the milk and cream in a saucepan over medium heat until it starts to bubble.
  3. Slowly whisk the warm milk and cream into the eggs in a separate bowl.
  4. Put the mixture back on medium heat and cook, continue to stir until it reaches 160 degrees
  5. Stir in the brandy and rum. (Chill and reheat if not ready to serve)
  6. Garnish with a sprinkle of nutmeg and a cinnamon stick.

 

About Eggnog

Besides mulled wine and hot chocolate with marshmallows, there’s no Christmas drink that’s more classic than eggnog. But, very much like Marmite, you either love it or hate it.

The word eggnog itself isn’t the sexiest of names and the thought of drinking eggs has the potential to make anyone baulk, but it’s not totally clear where the name derived from.

One story suggests the name derived from an Old English word for strong beer called “nog”. There’s also the possibility that it came from noggin, a word for a small cup that’s first known use was in 1588. But, what we do know is from as early as the 13th Century, medieval monks in Britain were known to drink posset, warm ale punch with eggs and figs.

It would be late 1700s that people christened the festive alcoholic drink “eggnog”, which by then the recipe has been spruced up with other ingredients – milk, cream, sugar, rum, brandy, sherry, you name it…

But in Britain, the drink was originally popular among the aristocracy because milk, eggs, and sherry were scarce commodities at the time and so, it was popular to use the eggy beverage as a toast to one’s health and prosperity.

But, when eggnog made its way to the Americas and other region, its popularity only grew.

Variations of eggnog, depending on where you’re from also exist, such as “coquito” — eggnog made with coconut milk — in Puerto Rico or a vanilla-flavoured eggnog called “rompope” in Mexico.

Talk about a boozy history.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

image credit: bhofack2/gettyimages.co.uk